Is Boxing Safe?

You’re in the ring with a challenger whose main goal is to punch you, and punch you hard. So, boxing is not fundamentally safe.

But then again, what sport is completely safe? Boxing can be an unsafe sport. But, so is cricket and mountaineering.

While a string of injuries and tragedies have marred professional boxing, steps have been taken to make boxing safer. When a pro boxer steps into the ring, he or she must be ready to fight for 12 three-minute rounds. The bottom line is the fights are shorter, so they (the boxers) are getting hit less. ”

Boxing gear can also be used to eliminate injuries. Pros use gloves (six ounces) in categories up to lightweight and gloves (eight ounces) above that weight. All amateur boxers use gloves (ten ounces) which are more tiring to hold up and take the power out of punches. The truth is you can’t punch hard with ten ounce gloves on.

Guards to protect the boxer’s head also help to diminish injuries, but aren’t worn to stop the kind of disturbing brain damage suffered by Michael Watson in his 1991 WBO world championship bout with Chris Eubank. They stop cut eyes when boxers clash heads, but that’s about it.

Based on what the ABA says, the way boxing is scored also urges less hazardous fighting. A boxer will normally win on points, and to get a point, three of the five judges have to push a button declaring a landed punch within one second of each other. The button-pushing system makes it useless for a boxer to throw some quick punches because the judges just won’t be able to keep up. “They can’t hit the buttons fast enough and when boxers get into the ring they are fully aware of this.