How to Keep Your Non-Athletic Child in Shape

Team sports can increase a kid’s fitness and self-esteem, aiding them in how to be around other adults and kids.

But some kids aren’t really athletes. They may tell parents that they just don’t enjoy sports. What then?

Not every kid has to join a team. With all other activities, children can be healthy without them. But try to discover why your kid isn’t interested. You might be able to help tackle deeper concerns or guide your kid toward something else.

Tell your kid that you’d like to work together on a solution. This may mean making changes and sticking with the sport or discovering a new activity to try.

Here are some thoughts why sports might be a turnoff for your kid:

Still Acquiring Basic Skills

Though lots of sports programs are offered for preschoolers, it’s not until around age 6 or 7 that most children have the attention span and the physical skills to understand the rules needed to play organized sports.

Kids who haven’t gotten any practice in a certain sport might need time to repeatedly perform necessary skills like kicking a soccer ball on the run or hitting a baseball thrown from the pitcher’s mound. Attempting and failing, particularly in a game situation, might aggravate them or make them anxious.

What you can do: Practice with your kid at home. Whether it’s playing catch, going for a jog together, or shooting baskets, you’ll give your child a chance to create fitness and skills in a safe setting. Your kid can try and maybe fail new things without the self-consciousness of being around friends. And you’re also developing some good quality together time.

Coach or League Is Too Competitive

A child who’s already an unenthusiastic athlete might feel very nervous when the coach screams orders or the league concentrates profoundly on winning.

What you can do: Check out sports programs before signing your kid up for one. Speak with coaches and other parents about the philosophy.

The Benefits of Ballet for Athletes

When you talk about ballet you don’t usually think about professional athletes. However, studies have shown that over 20% of professional athletes in the nation are now taking ballet classes. Most folks typically don’t link ballet with athletes, but ballet dancers are thought by lots of people as being the best athletes on earth.

Hershel Walker took ballet when he was on the Dallas Cowboys football team. The same goes for Walter Payton when he was on the Chicago Bears team. Many of the folks who do the workout are trying to enrich performance in sports like soccer, tennis, and basketball.

Improved flexibility is only one of the benefits

A ballet workout helps participants improve abdominal muscles and reduce waistlines. Most importantly, it crafts really lean muscles. Payton tells it like this: “In the beginning of my football career, I put in plenty of time forming bulky muscle to shield my body from the hard hits it was got on a regular basis. I had no notion of how much my speed was diminishing until I went to college. My time rose from 5.0 to 5.3 seconds. At Auburn, my coach recommended I take up ballet to get my speed back. I had no notion what I was in for. After a few weeks, I was totally spent and worn out. But, I got my speed back!”

Ballet is an artistic dance form done to music using very formalized, precise gestures and steps. These movements are tiresome on the body and mind. Ballet forces the body to its limit along with making unique muscles in the body providing many advantages for pro athletes. Some of the vital benefits to the ballet regimen are enhanced flexibility, and a great sense of poise and balance.

Even for folks in great shape, ballet will most likely make muscles they you didn’t realized they had.