At What Age Should a Child Start Participating in Sports

The age at which a child should start playing sports is not definite. Having said that, studies have shown that a child is physically and emotionally prepared for organized team play by the age of 7. Before that time, your kid’s attention span and dexterity may not match up well with the skills necessary for sports.

Your child loves kicking a ball around the yard and riding bikes in the driveway. However, that doesn’t mean the kid is ready for sports. Even though organized sports for toddlers are available, a 1st grader is ready to play well with others. By the age of 6 or 7, a child has the notions like passing the ball to a teammate, paying attention to the coach, and paying better attention to the game than waving to the parents.

Kids mature differently, so maybe your kindergarten-age kid is ready for recreational sports. Just be sure that your child has the mental, social, and physical skills necessary to play. A child is more as likely to succeed when he is ready. Ask yourself if your kid has the attention span for a whole soccer or basketball game. Does he like to share? Is he/she physically coordinated? If the answer to these questions is “yes,” then break out your video camera and get ready to watch your child tear it up big time!

Most little ones (toddlers) don’t have the skills like catching or throwing. Getting your kid into T-ball may just frustrate him if he has a hard time understanding the rules of the game or doesn’t have the skills necessary to play. You don’t want to turn your kid off to sports all together with a horrible introduction. This is why backing down from sports until the right age has its benefits and advantages.

Why Women Wear Fancy Hats to the Kentucky Derby

The people at William and Kate’s nuptials got plenty of attention for their choice of spectacular headwear, but the royal wedding isn’t the only affair known for its show of wild hats. The colorful, flashy, hats that women wear at the Kentucky Derby are a big part of the yearly horse race’s tradition — and the bigger, the better.

There isn’t a lot of history on the hats, but theory has it that when the derby was first brought to Kentucky, it was supposed to be a social affair.

The folks in charge went around to all the women’s clubs in town and invited the women to dress up in their finest to come to the Derby.

Over the years, the hat tradition has remained for women and remains a Kentucky Derby staple. Although women aren’t forced to wear a hat to the races, plenty do. One commonplace theme among Kentucky Derby hats is roses. Because the race is called the “run for the roses,” the champion horse gets a blanket of over of 500 blossoms.

The Kentucky Derby is every woman’s opportunity to express her inner Scarlett O’Hara. On the Kentucky Derby’s website, there are suggestions for women’s attire. The gem of a belle’s ensemble? A outstanding hat.

If the Derby hats remind you of something you’ve seen on the queen, or the princess, it because

The creator of the Kentucky Derby modeled the event after European-style racing affairs like the Royal Ascot, which requires full morning dress for men and hats for women.

When the Kentucky Derby started in 1875, both British and American women wanted to wear their best to the races. In those days, that most definitely included a hat. While statement headwear is usually not necessary formal attire today, the tradition remains at the Kentucky Derby.